The Discovery Update – July 2013

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01Jul2013

The Discovery Update – July 2013

  • atkinsonbaker
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July 2013

From the President

Our reporters have been serving many of your firms for over twenty years, and collectively they have transcribed 623,751 depositions in 8,555 different cities nationwide. What an accomplishment!

What follows are two recent comments from our clients which echoes feedback that we get from clients on a regular basis. I share these with you so you can see the types of comments we get from around the U.S. about our top-notch reporters.

“Your reporter was amazing! She arrived extra early to set up. Her personality is priceless. She is professional. I will always request her, and I hope we are able to have her every time. Please make a permanent note to send her to our office!” 
– H.C., Coral Gables, FL

“I took depositions recently in Orlando, Florida, with your court reporter. I don’t usually write such emails, but I wanted to make sure you know that she is an excellent court reporter. She was a pleasure to work with – professional, friendly, and very hardworking. The case is complicated and involved complex, technical explanations of how a certain software/hardware works, but she was able to work through everything quickly and keep up with the fast pace of the deposition. In summation, she is excellent and I would highly recommend her to any attorney in the future!”
– M.G., San Marino, CA

Our reporters are loyal and continue to be of the highest quality in the nation. Working for you gives them the drive to diligently work at improving their craft, and for that we thank you!

Best regards,
Sheila Atkinson-Baker

Control Sets: Introducing Precision, Recall, and F1 into Relativity-Assisted Review

Contributed by kCura Corporation Plain Spoken Form of Production

“Okay, students, please take out some paper and a pencil for a pop quiz.”

This is perhaps one of the most dreaded phrases uttered by teachers to students. A pop quiz is an unbiased test of a student’s knowledge of a subject and is used as a benchmark by teachers to see how the student is progressing. The key to the pop quiz is that the exact answers to the quiz were not previously provided by the teacher. This way, the teacher is able to see if the student is actually learning versus memorizing.

The new control set feature for Relativity-Assisted Review is a lot like a pop quiz is to a teacher—an unbiased and effective way to measure how your system is progressing in its learning throughout the Assisted Review process that makes sure you’re the only one with the answer key.

Let’s first take a look at how control sets work and then apply them to an example workflow.

Read White Paper

Defensible Deletion

By Philip Favro

When Kolon Industries, Inc., found itself on the wrong side of a $919 million verdict last year, the South Korean-based manufacturer probably started to take inventory on what it might have done differently to have avoided such a fate. While that list could have included any number of entries, somewhere near the top had to be an action item to revamp its information retention policies and litigation hold procedures. Breakdowns in those protocols led to the destruction of nearly 18,000 pages of electronically-stored information or ESI. This, in turn, resulted in a corresponding instruction to the jury in E.I. du Pont de Nemours v. Kolon Industries, 803 F.Supp.2d 469, that Kolon had engaged in wholesale destruction of key evidence. This eventually culminated in a devastating verdict against the manufacturer.

Read Full Article >>

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CONTROL SETS: INTRODUCING PRECISION, RECALL, AND F1 INTO RELATIVITY-ASSISTED REVIEW

DEFENSIBLE DELETION

DEPLOYING TRAINERS IN TECHNOLOGY-ASSISTED REVIEWS (TAR) WITHOUT “SPOILING THE BROTH”

PLAIN SPOKEN FORM OF PRODUCTION


WHAT YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED

Setting Up Review Workflows for Multi-Language Documents

Tangled: Taking the Knots Out of E-Mail Threads and Near Duplicates

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Deploying Trainers in Technology-Assisted Reviews without “Spoiling the Broth”
Read Article >>
Plain Spoken Form of Production
Read Article >>
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Vocabulary Improvement for Lawyers
Try it
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HEAD SCRATCHER

I have one, you have one. If you remove the first letter, a bit remains. If you remove the second, bit still remains. After much trying, you might be able to remove the third one also, but it remains. It dies hard!

What is it?

Email us the right answer and you could be randomly drawn as the winner of a $25 gift card!

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