ABI Reporter Spotlight with June Cochrane

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27Dec2013

ABI Reporter Spotlight with June Cochrane

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MEET JUNE COCHRANE…

What got you into court reporting?

I originally had thought of being a court reporter while in high school. But being overseas there was very little info on the field. So I ended up getting my college degree and moving into the world of retail management and being a diamond consultant. With only one test left to become certified in the diamond industry, I decided it was time for a career change. Upon going through the Yellow Pages for schools, I found court reporting. Now I have been a working reporter for 10 years.

Any suggestions or tips you’d offer to fellow reporters, whether about reporting or running your own business?

Being an independent reporter means freedom: freedom to work as much as you want, or as little as you want. Your time is yours to control. To be successful takes time. You will find what it takes to make the income you’re comfortable with and still be able to have a life.

What training or information has been MOST useful to
you towards efficiency in your work?

I found that once I started doing realtime for myself years ago there was a big change in my writing, with less and less untranslates. I was able to see my work as I was doing it, and I was in a position right there and then to perfect my writing to an even higher level. This really made a difference.

Any tricks you can share for organizing your time, work or life?

I find that having a Job Assignment Record for each month is extremely beneficial. I  list the jobs that I have taken, on a daily basis, along with the approximate pages. Then I have status columns to let me know where I’m at and a column when it is due. This way I keep track of what has to be done and how I am doing on pages for the month. This is what I use to find my comfort level for work and finances and to track if I’m taking on too much or not enough.

What challenges do you see happening in the industry in the next five years?
Any suggestions or advice regarding this?

There are challenges in the industry and there always will be. ER has always been a threat. But realtime will be our saving grace. Pay reductions for special clients can set a bad precedent in the industry, which also makes it impossible to have a scopist or proofreader if the rate paid is too low.  It’s up to us not to sell ourselves out. This is a great profession. We need to talk it up at high schools, for example, in career days, letting students know about us. This is truly an excellent profession, even with all its challenges. Challenges are what make life interesting.

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