The Discovery Update – January 2015

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08Jan2015

The Discovery Update – January 2015

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January 2015

From the President

We are pleased to announce the launch of our newly redesigned website. Our new website reinforces our company’s commitment to provide you with advanced technological tools that enhance our services to you.

We have sincerely appreciated the opportunities throughout the past year to provide you with full service court reporting services nationwide. Working with you has been enjoyable and rewarding. We continue to strive to give you the best quality of service possible and to stay one step ahead of your needs.

We want all of our court reporting services to be value-added aspects of your litigation practice. I welcome your feedback on how we can better serve you in the next year.

Best regards,
Sheila Atkinson-Baker

Predictive Coding, Seed Sets, and the Work Product Doctrine

By Philip Favro

The use of predictive coding has been both contagious and controversial since its use began in eDiscovery. On the one hand, predictive coding has found welcome recipients in clients, counsel, and the courts, all of whom are seeking to expedite the ESI search and review process. Nevertheless, there have been disagreements regarding various aspects of predictive coding. One of the key items in dispute concerns whether the attorney work product doctrine should protect the documents that counsel selects to help train the predictive coding process. This is a significant issue which, if left unresolved, could very well undermine the proliferation of this search and review methodology.

There is little disagreement over the significance that those documents – commonly referred to as training or seed sets – play in a properly functioning predictive coding workflow. Seed set documents are essential for training a predictive coding algorithm to identify the documents that “are the most relevant to the case and most representative of those for which each side is looking.” Where the predictive coding cognoscenti – and courts – disagree is whether a lawyer’s selection of seed set documents is protected from discovery by the attorney work product doctrine.

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Five Questions You Should Ask About Big Data Security and E-discovery

By Brian Meegan

In the era of big data, vetting and asking the right security questions can help your organization save money and have peace of mind when it comes to ediscovery. Below is a general overview of some of the most important questions you should be discussing with your outside law firms and ediscovery service providers. Developing a thorough security RFI created in tandem with your IT/IS department to truly vet these organizations is highly recommended.

1) How is data stored, secured, and monitored? Knowing how and where your data will be stored once you transmit it for ediscovery processing and hosting are some of the most important questions you can ask.

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PREDICTIVE CODING, SEED SETS, AND THE WORK PRODUCT DOCTRINE

FIVE QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK ABOUT BIG DATA SECURITY AND E-DISCOVERY

ANATOMY OF A GOOD DEPOSITION QUESTION

DON’T ARGUE “HUMAN ERROR” FOR NOT SEARCHING ESI


WHAT YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED

Blind as a Cat: Lawyers vs. Native Production

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Anatomy of a Good Deposition Question
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Don’t Argue “Human Error” For Not Searching ESI
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23 Free Review Stamps for Acrobat
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Microsoft Word for iPhone and iPad
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